The mathematics of a perfect day

By Katharine Swan On Monday, October 18, 2010 At 2:29 PM

Last Thursday, I had one of those rare perfect days.  Well, close enough — it took me a little while to get warmed up, but in the end I was able to achieve my ideal working pace.  Everything seems to be taking me up to twice as long lately, so this was a really big deal!

For me, a perfect day seems to be about 4 hours (give or take) of client work.  This gives me time to get warmed up in the morning, check email and Facebook, do a little blog reading, maintain my own blogs, and maybe do a little marketing.  It also gives me time to take short breaks throughout the day, which I can't seem to make myself forego.

I think my perfect day goes a little bit like this:

½ hour getting caught up on email (work and personal)
½ hour checking other blogs
1-2 hours working on my own blogs and/or marketing
5 or so hours spent on client work, usually in 1-2 hour blocks, with Facebook and email breaks in between (the extra hour "or so" is to account for breaks)

On Thursday I had a limited amount of time, so I cut out the blogging in favor of getting the work done earlier.  I was done for the day by 3:30, and I couldn't help but think how nice it would be if I could be that efficient all the time.  Then I could easily skip blogging and other marketing every other day, or move it to the evening, in order to make more time for horseback riding during the day.

What is your perfect workday like?

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Katharine Swan is a full-time freelance writer with more than 5 years of professional writing experience. In addition to maintaining several personal blogs, she writes a variety of online marketing materials for clients, including company blogs, articles, and press releases. In her free time, she spends time with her horse, reads, and writes fiction.

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